Education


KASTELEWICZ music in progress provides introductionary level or higher textbooks for musicological subjects. To achieve this, the Agency carries out interviews and research on composers and performers.

In 2016, the Agency took over the Summer Academy of the Universität Mozarteum Salzburg program and the Vienna Festivkatalogs Modern 29 A-Z.

17. Juli
gala concert as opening
21. und 22. Juli
debut performance Georg Friedrich Haas: „Das kleine Ich-bin-ich (I am Me)“
24. Juli
“master concert” I
6. August
 “master concert” II
7. August
“master concert” III
8. August
“portrait concert” Friedrich Cerha
15. August
 “master concert” IV
20. August
“master concert” V
21. August
“master concert” VI

 

Every summer, in July and August, the Universität Mozarteum Salzburg organises the International Summer Academy, with 60 masterclasses, and between 800 and 1000 participants, making it one of the largest institutions of its kind in the world.

Excerpts from the booklets (translated)

 

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The instruments

The composer Georg Friedrich Haas divides the musicians into two groups: strings, percussion and accordion accompany as an orchestra, while wind players and harp as soloists are first hiding behind a curtain, in order to then also appear on the playing surface. For the musicians of the Klangforum Wien, this means to memorize these passages by heart. Haas is grateful to the fact that the musicians accept this challenge and dare to experiment with the world premiere.

The composition

A comparison with the musical fairytale of Prokofiev’s “Peter and the Wolf” is obvious. While in Prokofiev’s thematic material and motifs with their assigned animals in history and music return, the animals emerge in the history of Mira Lobe one after the other and (with one exception) only once. The instruments and musical passages assigned to the animals by Haas are thus played one after the other and only once in a play. Fortunately, “I would not even know how I should have let the Basstuba reappear,” says Haas jokingly in a conversation. With this piece and this story, the composer wants to interact with the audience. Children, parents and friends are invited to participate in the happening, to sing with and to speak with texts. To this end, a small rehearsal with the conductor Johannes Kalitzke is to be given before the beginning of the play. The realization “ich-bin-ich” (I am me) is to be experienced rightly. It will be exciting not only in terms of stage, but also in musical terms. Haas does not want to reveal his compositional techniques in the work – the listeners should hear, should experience. The techniques are only there to implement and express the desired. Original revolutionary compositional techniques of the twentieth century such as microtonality, seriality or twelve-tone technology are today a matter of course. Haas uses everything that is possible. The sound, the sound of the clang, is decisive for him. “Do not expect melodies to whistle. Just listen with open ears “. So what will we hear? A sound drama! So much may be betrayed: An unexpected, very beautiful sound emerges at the cutting edge – which draws itself to the end and still builds up.

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Text and Interview: A.B. Kastelewicz

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Friedrich Cerha is one of the most well-known Austrian composers of the present and has played a vital role inthe development of musician life in Austria. Not just through his work, which in itself is extensive, but also through a multitude of other activities and other jobs he’s done.

Especially his commitment for promotion, development and distribution of new music. There is public recognition for his work, with a good example being his presidency in the Austrian Section for the International New Music Society (IGNM) (1968-1975) and later honnorary membership. In 1958, he founded, along with fellow composerse the Ensemble “Die Reihe”. The modern music and its new sounds had to be made famous amog the vinnese audience. In the following years, he taught various subjects at the Vienna Music Academy and from 1964 to 1970 he taught a special electronic music course there. However, he didn’t stop leading violin and conducting courses. He has been the director of various orchestras, ensembles, opera productions and festivals, all dedicated to the cultivation of new music.

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Text and Interview: A.B. Kastelewicz

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“Trübe Wolken” (blearly clouds) gives an experimental and eldritch sound all at once. Liszt created a fundament of semi-tone movements mixed with reduced three-tones and connects them with a melody based on a Hungarian minor scale (called the “gypsy” scale) with two exceeding steps. Franz Liszt used this method especially for his Hungarian rhapsodies. The strucure of the set is open.

“Nuages gris” is comopositionally a view in the future. “Nuages gris” inspired coming generations of composers like Debussy who created “Nuages” , Kagel who composed “Unguis incarnatus est” and Holliger to his creation “Zwei Liszt-Transkriptionen”.

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Text und Interview: Anna Barbara Kastelewicz

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Bach has already been cantor at the “Tomaskirche” in Leipzig for 10 years when around 1730 this fantasy and fugue g-minor, “BMV 542” was born. His income wasn’t too favourable while his tasks were enormous. Every Sunday Bach had to perform and compose a new cantata. Besides this, he had to teach Latin at the “Thomasschule”. In addition to this there he did musical services at funerals, weddings and other festivities to improve his poorly fee.

In 1729, he also took over the administration of the “telemannic” Collegium musicum which performed instrumental acts one or two times a week mostly in coffee houses located in Leipzig. It was then, when Bach started using the harpsichord as a solo instrument – probably to give his two sons a chance to perform as soloists and to get experiences.

Besides this he tried to expand his sphere of activity to reach more than the official business in Leipzig. He travelled and took over order compositions and homage compositions. As an example, a request and the dedication of the h-minor mass to the elector of Dresden brought him the title of the Saxon-Polish “Hoff-composer”.

The fact that he created and performed that many masterpieces in this situation, shows Bach’s genius and his creative power. A period began, in which he mostly turned to instrumental music, especially for the organ and the harpsichord.

It is no surprise, that because of the extend of his work, Bach went back to already existing works and recreated them. Each of the thirteen concerts for one or more harpsichords with string players and “basso continuo” is an adaption of his own or somebody else’s ensemble concert, besides one: this concerto written in c-major for 2 harpsichords.

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Text: Anna Barbara Kastelewicz

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At today’s concert, we experience Thomas Riebl’s five-sting tenor viola, built by the violin maker Bernd Hiller. He built it after Riebl’s wishes. A constructional task: a viola, which is still light enough to be played on the arm, but strong enough to hold out the pressure of the extra F- or E-string.

Schubert’s “Arpeggione-Sonata”, which was written for an instrument called the arpeggione, which today is only found in museums, was the trigger for this task. Today’s violists must play this work on a viola and they have to transpose some passages, which means they have to play higher octaves at some points, because otherwise the notes wouldn’t be playable. It was Riebl’s wish to play the original composition.

To extend the repertoire for the new created instrument, Riebl authorized composers to write compositions for it. Born was Rudolf Jungwirth’s (*1955) “Élégie – Hommage à Gérarf Grisey for the five-string tenor-viola” which is dedicated to Thomas Riebl. Even the young composer Michael Andreas Grolid, who plays violin and viola himself, got the order to create a composition. He took this special instrument and composed his “Image” for the five-string tenor-viola. He got to know Riebl at a master class course, which was led by Riebl in Norway. Grolid even played with his own string quartet while he was there. Riebl appeared to like it, so he gave him the order to compose for him.

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Text und Interview: Anna Barbara Kastelewicz

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Hungarian folk music and gypsy music

Both musicians, Zoltán Kodály and Béla Bartók, contributed to the development of a national influenced Hungarian music style in the European context, in their own special ways. At the beginning of the 20th century, they established renovations in the Hungarian music. With devotion, both explored the musical roots of their nation – probably motivated by the trend of time, the upcoming patriotism which came by the end of the 19th century and which was increased by the absolute governmental independence of Hungary after 1918. Both did scientific research in the Hungarian folk music from the different Hungarian regions. They investigated songs and dance music, which still existed in written, phonographic or oral tradition at the population. Three to four thousand of these melodies were collected, classified and published for the first time in a fieldwork in 1906. It was shown, that the collected melodies were totally different than the “gipsy melodies” which were very famous in the 19th century. The lively music of the people who were mostly living in the countryside didn’t have much to do with the popular and idealized “gipsy music” which was misleading taken for typical Hungarian music. Especially the differences they’ve found in the different regions were interesting for them. For example, the ones between the major-minor system and the symmetry ideal of the classic melody formation.

Musical starting point

These results were for both, Kodálik and Bartók, the starting point for a creative, musical development. However, both had different conclusions for their compositions and took separate ways. Bartók used the folkloristic melodies and increased elements like rhythm, shape, melodic motives and simplicity. His musical language went in Western European avant-garde directions, just like the current flow. Meanwhile Kodály recorded the melodies and tried to integrate them into his compositions. He used authentic melodies and melody parts. This principle, the consequent recourse of authentic folk songs, goes so far, that even the whole opera “Die Spinnstube” is build out of original folk songs and dances. It was performed in 1932 in Budapest. In other compositions, like for example the variations of “Der Pfau” at least the subject is taken out of a folk song or besides the original folk songs, he also used melodies, which

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Text: Anna Barbara Kastelewicz